ERASMUS PROGRAM COORDINATION OFFICE

Course Descriptions

ISTANBUL MEDENIYET UNIVERSITY

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR ERASMUS+ STUDENTS

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING PROGRAM

ELT 103 Reading Skills I (2-0) ECTS 2

Students will acquire the skills needed for academic reading. They will learn how to do skimming, scanning, understanding the main idea and details. In addition, students will do pleasure reading and read stories and academic articles. They will be encouraged to have productive skills in addition to reading. Shortly, this course aims to equip students, as prospective English teachers, with an advanced understanding of academic reading which they will need as professionals.

ELT 104 Reading Skills II (2-0) ECTS 2

Students will acquire the skills needed for academic reading. They will learn how to unearth the structure of an academic reading text and they will be able to critically analyze the texts they read. In addition, students will do pleasure reading and read stories and academic articles which will contribute to their academic and professional development. They will be encouraged to have productive skills and critical thinking skills in addition to reading strategies. Shortly, this course aims to equip students, as prospective English teachers, with an advanced understanding of academic reading which they will need as professionals.

ELT 105 Listening and Pronunciation I (2-0) ECTS 2

Students will learn a new alphabet called International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and write English words using IPA. Using IPA will develop their speaking and pronunciation. They will be able to understand the differences between sounds & letters, consonants (manner & place of articulation) & vowels (monophthongs, diphthongs, triphthongs) and segments & suprasegmentals. Students will also learn syllables and syllable structures of English and understand the consonant clusters.

ELT 106 Listening and Pronunciation II (2-0) ECTS 3

Students will learn the suprasegmental features of language. They will be able to perform utterances with different intonations and with different word & sentence stresses (stress patterns) and also other suprasegmental features of English. They will also learn the phonological processes in English, e.g. hiatus, assimilation, dissimilation, metathesis etc.

ELT 107 Oral Communication Skills I (2+0) AKTS 2 / ELT 108 Oral Communication Skills II (2+0) ECTS 2

This course introduces a comprehensive approach to oral communication which includes training in the fundamental principles of public speaking and the effective delivery of oral presentations. With the goal of enhancing students’ general facility and confidence in oral expression, this course is designed to develop each student’s ability to communicate effectively both in formal and informal contexts.

ELT 109 Writing Skills I (2-0) ECTS 2

Students will acquire academic writing skills. Students will learn topic sentences, thesis statements, supporting sentences and conclusion. In addition, they will be able to write a systematic paragraph and then, they will learn how to write an essay. Shortly, this course aims to equip students, as prospective English teachers, with an advanced understanding of academic writing which they will need as professionals and potential academicians.

ELT 110 Writing Skills II (2-0) ECTS 3

Students will acquire academic writing skills. They will learn how to write about academic issues in a systematic way. Students will learn how to write different types of essays. In this sense, this course aims to equip students, as prospective English teachers, with an advanced understanding of academic essay writing which they will need as professionals and potential academicians.

ELT 112 Structure of English Language (2-0) ECTS 2

Students will acquire the knowledge of the advanced grammar issues in English. Students will learn advanced grammar topics such as conditionals, passives, relative clauses and noun clauses in English. In addition, students will be able to use this knowledge with regard to appropriate contexts. They will be encouraged to have productive skills as well as receptive skills. Shortly, this course aims to equip students, as prospective English teachers, with an advanced understanding of English grammar which they will need as professionals.

ELT 201 Approaches to English Language Learning and Teaching (2-0) ECTS 3

Definitions of English Language Learning and Teaching, objective and basic principles of English language teaching, background of English language teaching, reflections of learning and teaching approaches on English language teaching, basic skills in English language teaching, in-class practises, current issues in English language teaching, components of an effective English language teaching, a social, cultural and economic approach to English language teaching.

ELT 202 English Language Teaching Curriculum (2-0) ECTS 3

Basic concepts about curriculum, a historical overview of the development of English language teaching curriculum, current approaches for English language teaching curriculum, content, target objectives, learning outcomes, distribution and limitation of the learning outcomes in terms of the grades, connections with the other courses, connections among different English language teaching curriculums for different school stages, methods, techniques, instructional materials, testing and evaluation approach, teacher competence.

ELT 203 English Literature I (2+0) ECTS 4

This course is a survey of canonical British literary works which starts from the Old English Period and introduces a broad range of texts allowing the student to read literature sensitively while adopting critical thinking. Representative authors are introduced and some major works in prose, drama and poetry are discussed in the light of literary movements, historical and social developments in that age.

ELT 204 English Literature II (2+0) ECTS 4

This course is a survey of canonical American literary works which starts from the Colonial Era and introduces a broad range of texts, exposing students to terminology and modes of approach to the study and analysis of literary texts with the aim of developing the skills necessary.

ELT 205 Linguistics I (2-0) ECTS 3

Students will learn the components of language, i.e. Phonetics & Phonology (vowels and consonants, phones, phonemes, allophones, phonological processes etc.), Morphology (morphs, morphemes, allomorphs, lexical categories, word formation, morphological typology etc.) and Syntax (Generative grammar, deep and surface structures, constituency, phrase structure rules, transformations, sentence types, drawing tree diagrams).

ELT 206 Linguistics II (2-0) ECTS 3

Students will learn the other components of language, i.e. Semantics (word, sentence and utterance meaning, lexical semantics, semantic roles and grammatical relations) and Pragmatics (language use and information structure, speech acts, the cooperative principle, politeness and the organization of conversation). Students will also learn writing systems, language acquisition (first and second languages) and the role of Linguistics in language teaching. 

ELT 207 Critical Reading and Writing (2-0) ECTS 3

Students will acquire and develop the necessary critical thinking skills and make analysis and synthesis of written texts. In this process, students first will learn how to analyze the texts consisting of various contents in a critical perspective and produce texts regarding the synthesis of different opinions and ideas.  To achieve these aims, students will be encouraged two contrasting text and write well-developed essays within the scope of the information they gain throughout the reading passages.   

ELT 208 Language Acquisition (2-0) ECTS 3

Language acquisition, first and second language acquisition theories (behaviourism, innatism, information processing, connectionist models, interactional approach), developmental stages of first language and target language, case studies, a comparative analysis of first and second language use from corpus data, recordings and transcriptions of in-class second language interaction and a comparison of second language acquisition for children and adults, developmental stages of first language acquisition, syntactic development stages in second language acquisition, second language acquisition processes, leaner characteristics in second language acquisition and individual differences in attainments (e.g. personality, language aptitude, intelligence, age, motivation and attitude, learner preferences and beliefs), differences of EFL and ESL contexts (e.g. natural versus instructional contexts).

FACULTY OF ARTS & HUMANITIES / SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT

SOCIOLOGY OF MUSIC

SOC 423 | Undergraduate [+also SOC 703, Graduate] | Prerequisite: None.

Course Description:

This course aims to analyze the relationship between music and society in terms of the production, representation and consumption of music. The objective here is to explore different music cultures throughout different genres such as symphonic music, folk music, pop, hip-hop, etc. as well as to examine music itself as an important component of every culture. In this context, political economy, changing social functions and digitalization of music are to be explored from a macro-sociological perspective, while micro-sociological perspective of this course is concerned with the interactions between musicians and audience. Sourcing from the classical and contemporary readings, the course also encourages students to conduct a musical performance analysis as a written assignment.

MEDIA AND SOCIETY

SOC 227 | Undergraduate | Prerequisite: None.

Course Description:

This course covers a sociological understanding and a critical analysis of the production, distribution, reception and consumption of media as an area of social practice. Throughout the interdisciplinary media literature, this course aims to examine how various media industries (ex: radio, TV, press, internet, etc.) are organized and how such organizations are transformed by social regulations, international competition, and new technologies. With a grounding in mass communication theories, the course also aims to evaluate the characteristics of the communication patterns between mass media and mass society.

SOCIAL STRATIFICATION

SOC 302 | Undergraduate | Prerequisite: None.

Course Description:

The aim of this course is to provide students with classical and contemporary theoretical perspectives on social stratification. Key issues of this course include forms and sources of inequality, discrimination in terms of race, ethnicity and gender, as well as the outcomes of globalization and social mobility. Students will be acquainted with the most important concepts, findings and debates in the field. Therefore, this course encourages students to think critically and analytically on social stratification and to apply some of these concepts of inequality to major substantive social problems.

URBAN SOCIOLOGY

SOC 302 | Undergraduate | Prerequisite: None.

Course Description:

This course develops a critical comprehension of social issues on urban spaces within the contexts of globalization, post-industrialization and social change. Starting with theories about how cities are socially and spatially organized, the course draws upon a variety of theoretical frameworks, methodological approaches and sociological questions. Topics include social inequality, metropolitan problems, suburbanization, urban recycling, socio-spatial change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. Exploring the ways urban spaces shape identities, communities and societies by examining the consequences of urbanization process and the changing city landscapes is another aim of this course. Students who successfully complete all course requirements will learn how to apply sociological approaches for analyzing urban problems.

SOS 101  Introduction to Sociology I. Undergraduate. Prerequisite: None

The course is an introduction to sociology. It introduces students to the sociological ways of thinking, to basic sociological modes of inquiry, and to the fundamental concepts, principles, and themes of the discipline. Topics covered are not limited to but include the rise of sociology as a modern social science, sociological imagination, society and culture, comparison of traditional and modern societies, social stratification and forms of inequality.

SOS 406 Sociology of Religion: Undergraduate. Prerequisite: Introduction to sociology or a similar intro to social science course.

The course introduces undergraduate students to basic concepts and theories on religion developed under the discipline of sociology. It teaches classical and contemporary sociological approaches to religion. It aims to help students acquire a social scientific perspective on religion and social dimensions of religious phenomena. The course elaborates on the possibilities and difficulties of sociologically examining religion; different ways of defining religion; key sociological thinkers’ ideas on religion, and contemporary theories on religion that explain individual as well as communal religiosity or its lack of, such as the classical secularization theory or the analysis of new religious movements.

Anthropology and Sociology of Islam: Graduate. Prerequisite: Completion of a B.A. degree in Sociology, Anthropology, or Religious Studies.

The course examines studies conducted on Islam in anthropology and sociology. A deep reading and analysis of some key anthropological and sociological texts on Islam will be pursued. Historical and analytical shifts in anthropological and sociological works that investigate Islam and Muslims will be traced. Reading material will include studies about Islam and Muslims in different parts of the world; but will focus primarily on those about Islam in Europe, Turkey, and the Middle East. The course aims to undertake a theoretical, analytical, and comparative investigation of trends in anthropology and sociology of Islam. The course is designed as a seminar in which students will be asked to complete the assigned readings and attend discussions.

Social History or Historical Sociology. Advanced Undergraduate. Prerequisite: None but Senior Undergraduate Students in History or Sociology are Preferred.

The course addresses the question of the possibilities and challenges in merging sociological and historical studies. It will undertake an examination of the development of social history and historical sociology as related but also two separate sub-disciplines under history and sociology, respectively. The course will expose students to major studies conducted in social history and historical anthropology. Students are required to have completed introductory courses in sociology and/or history as well as some courses in sociological or historical theory and methods. The course is designed as a seminar in which students will be asked to complete the assigned readings and attend discussions.

Introduction to Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish State and Society. Undergraduate. Prerequisite: None.

This course is designed to introduce students to the intellectual, socio-economic, and political dynamics that shaped the late Ottoman Empire and the rise of modern Turkey. The course will explore the modernization of the Ottoman Empire and the transformations that lead to the making of the modern Turkey. Continuities as well as changes and radical ruptures between Ottoman imperial structures and Turkish nation-state will be analyzed. The course is designed at an introductory level for students who have limited background in Ottoman and Turkish history as well as for those that seek to develop an academic, socio-historical perspective on Turkey.

Bureaucracy and Modernity. Graduate Course. Prerequisite: None.

This graduate level course analyzes the formation of modernity through the lens of bureaucracy. It focuses on the development and transformation of bureaucratic organizations, apparatuses, and structures in tracing modern forms of governance. Main sociological theories on bureaucracy will be explored. A comparative examination of the development of modern bureaucracies across different late-modern European and non-European empires will be pursued through examining specific scholarly works. Similarities and differences between early modern bureaucracies and contemporary bureaucratic organizations will also be discussed. The course is designed as a seminar in which students will be asked to complete the assigned readings and attend discussions.